Friday, January 22, 2016

Mystical Myanmar (2014) Day 4 & 5: Impressive Inle Lake

Date Visited: 12th January 2014

We left the ancient city of Bagan and travelled to a beautiful highland lake, the Inle Lake via a public bus. We bought the 7.30 am bus tickets and the journey from Bagan to Nyaung Shwe of Inle Lake took more than eight hours bus ride. Although the bus ride was uncomfortable and time consuming comparing to those VIP buses which we took earlier from Yangon to Bagan, however it was relatively cheaper, for as low as 11,000 kyats only (approx. to US$11 or RM37). Overnight bus is available but my friends and I opted the morning one so that we able to enjoy the awesome scenery and landscape. 

Myanmar, Inle Lake
#1: Welcome to Inle Lake

By the time we reached Nyaung Shwe, it was pretty late evening and instantly we decided to check-in into our hotel before going out for dinner. (I will share about Myanmar's accommodations my friends and I stayed in the upcoming posts). The check-in process wasn't that long, probably there was no other guests except for us and from there, we decided to book a boat trip on the lake. We managed to bargain at the agreed price of 25,000 kyats for the six of us on a wooden longtail boat with padded chairs (approx. to US$25 or RM85) and we're requested to pay upfront fee of 5,000 kyats first whereas the remaining can be paid at the end of the trip. 

Our boat tour started as early as 7 am and luckily for us, the boat station is situated not far away from our hotel. Now, let's start the engine! 

Myanmar, Inle Lake 03
#2: The remarkably skillful and elegant technique of Burmese fishermen to catch fish  

Myanmar, Inle Lake 04
#3: A colony of seagulls flying freely amidst the sunrise view

Inle Lake -  Phaung Daw Oo Pagoda
#4: Phaung Daw Oo Pagoda, the most highly revered monastery in Inle Lake

Myanmar, Inle Lake 01
#5: One of the floating villages we visited. Love the reflection of this photo #nofilter 

Myanmar, Inle Lake 01-1
#6: Can't get enough of this reflection 

Hundreds of these wooden houses are built high on stilts, just like the one we experienced in Tonle Sap of Siem Reap Cambodia but I personally think this one is thousand times better. Inle Lake is also commonly known as "Venice of the East" because the local here are heavily depend on their boat as their mode of transportation. Cruising through these floating villages are indeed a sight to behold and completely serenely picturesque to everyone who had been here.  

Myanmar, Inle Lake 06
#7

Myanmar, Inle Lake 05
#8: Kayan women, who wear traditional rings which elongate around their necks

Our boat driver brought us to few handicraft workshops such as lotus, silk and cotton hand weaving centre until to a certain point, he stopby at Kayan tribe village. Initially I thought Kayan tribe was originally from Thailand not until I visited here, I was totally wrong at all. 

Myanmar, Inle Lake 07
#9: Wooden longtail boat with padded chairs 

Myanmar, Inle Lake 08
#10: The entrance fee for Inle Lake area has increased within a year, from US$5 to US$10

Inle Lake is the last city my friends and I visited, before we travelled back again to Yangon. I found out most of the times, the last city I visited is always my most favourite city of that particular country. For instance, Luang Prabang of Laos and now Inle Lake of Myanmar. Like they said, save the best for last. 

5 comments:

  1. Myanmar! Indeed a mystical and lovely place. Would love to visit it some day.

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  2. The photo of the fisherman balancing his body, so cute and I'm impressed by the skill! *hopefully he didn't fall into sea, haha!

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  3. Auwww... I've just purchased a ticket to Myanmar. Sooo cantik inle lake.. My wishlist!

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  4. OMG! That photo of the fisherman balancing on the pole is amazing!

    Wonderful shot, perfect timing too.

    I love the picture where the stilt houses are all reflected on the water's surface too.

    Love your writeup, I just read an article about the Kayan women too. I've always though it sounded very painful though. I hear it's not the neck that's elongated but rather the shoulder bones being pressed down. :S

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  5. Really love the photos in this post ...especially the village


    Wah lau eh...terrer la the fisherman

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